Course Description of 2015 Fall Semester

Course Name: CHINESE COMPANY LAW

  Course Description:

  2 hours/week

  16 weeks

  32 hours total

  This course analyzes the basic concepts, rules, practices and institutions of international trade regulation. The focus would be on the World Trade Organization (WTO) rules and practice, as well as associated Chinese laws and practices. Special attention will be given to comparing WTO rules and China’s obligations on one hand, and to China’s trade laws, on the other hand, which include: export and import controls, market access, origin rules for services, the interplay between China’s international obligations and domestic legal system, and remedies against dumping, subsidies, and unfair trade practices.

  The course also studies other trade arrangements involving China, including regional integration (e.g., China-ASEAN Agreement on Trade in Services) and domestic arrangements (e.g. Mainland-Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement).

  The course consists of lectures and seminars. Students may participate in simulations (e.g., responding to client inquiries arising from WTO and other disputes involving China), or make a presentation. The course will provide a solid foundation for lawyers and business people who handle with trade regulation involving China.

  


 

Course Name:Civil Law

  Course Description:

  2 hours/week

  16 weeks

  32 hours total

  Civil law is a course about how the law shapes and governs relationships among people (natural and legal persons) regarding their personal and property rights. This course consists of two major sub-courses: General Theories of civil law (CLI) and Specific Theories of civil law (CLII).

  CLI is designed to provide the student an understanding of the fundamentals of civil law with focus on the basic theories and institutions. This course covers Basic Principles of civil law, Law of Persons, Juristic Acts, Agency and Limitation and Prescription

  CLII introduces students to the specific civil law institutions and provisions in a context that encourages critical evaluation. This course focuses on Law of Property and Law of Obligations. Students are encouraged to develop an understanding of the crucial role property law has played and continues to play in the development and maintenance of our legal and economic systems. It considers rules affecting both personal and real property. Law of Obligations deals with the general provisions of an obligation and provides basic theories and rules for tort and contract.

  


 

Course Name: Introduction to Chinese Legal System

  Course Description:

  2 hours/week

  16 weeks

  32 hours total

  This course — Introduction to Chinese Law — covers two parts: the transition and development of Chinese ancient legal system, and the modern Chinese legal system.

  The content of the first part mainly focuses on Chinese legal history. Those important and influential ideas and thoughts in ancient China would be introduced and discussed so that the various forms of Chinese ancient law can be understood thoroughly. For the modern part, some main branches of Chinese law will be briefly discussed, such as the constitutional law, the general principles of civil law, the criminal law, the civil procedure law and the criminal procedure law, etc. in order that a general structure of Chinese law can be shaped in mind.

  The whole course will occupy 16 weeks, that is, from 2nd week to the 17th week. It is scheduled to spend 7 weeks discussing the first part of the course, 8 weeks, for the second part.  Presentation by the students is planned to do in the 17th week, which would make up a large percentage of the final score. The attendance to class is another part of the final score.

  


 

Course Name: Labor and Employment Law

  Course Description:

  2 hours/week

  16 weeks

  32 hours total

  Detailed description will be available at your first class.

  


 

Course Name: Chinese Competition Law

  Instructor: Wang Huaiyong, School of Economic Law

  Course Description:

  2 hours/week

  16 weeks

  32 hours total

  Chinese Competition Law , a course takes one semester to complete and gives oversea students a thorough overview of the theories and practices of Chinese competition law. Students are introduced to theoretical approaches to Chinese competition law, and then given case study examples of the application of these approaches to historical and contemporary events. As a result, students are expected to begin to be able to critically evaluate competing theories and to apply theory to empirical material.

  The course concentrates itself on two important fields: anti-unfair competition law and anti-monopoly law, in which the students very likely encounter legal issues in their future professional lives. The anti-unfair competition law stands on the high level of social macro interest with the aim to maintain fair competition system and commercial ethics of honesty and fairness. The anti-monopoly law has a great significance in maintaining market new order and promoting the economy developed stably and healthily. It is expected that the students can acquire a good grasp of the key concepts and principles of competition law and develop the necessary analytical skills for resolving competition law issues in real-life cases, as well as building the familiarity with Chinese commercial practice.